School Choice

Recent Issues

For Latinos, Education is Key to Success

NOVEMBER 5, 2015 | Commentary by BRITTNEY PARKER

For the Hispanic community, education is the key to making the American Dream a reality. Yet far too many Latinos remain victims of their ZIP code and socio-economic status when it comes to quality schooling.

Education Spending & Academic Achievement

MAY 19, 2015 | Policy Points by COMMONWEALTH FOUNDATION

Increased education spending has not led to improved academic performance. This is reflected in SAT scores and NAEP results, as well numerous studies at the state, national, and international level. To improve academic performance, policymakers should pursue a student-based funding formula, mandate relief, and expanded school choice. 

Wolf's Education Doctrine

MAY 5, 2015 | Commentary by JAMES PAUL

Governor Wolf has wasted little time crystalizing his vision for public education—and it doesn’t look promising for families supportive of school choice. If his first few months are any indication this much is certain: Wolf is hostile to schools of choice, cozy to union interests, and wedded to the educational status quo.

Recent Blog Posts

Cyber Schools: Serving an Important Need

NOVEMBER 12, 2015

In light of stagnating achievement among K-12 students, the last thing Pennsylvania should do is crack down on alternative educational options. Yet a growing chorus says 35,000 students enrolled in Pennsylvania's innovative cyber charter schools should be denied the educational experience that best suits their needs.

I recently submitted a letter to the editor to the Easton Express-Times on this subject:

Stanford University study is the most recent catalyst for cyber school criticism, but the online education frontier is perpetually under fire in Pennsylvania. Gov. Tom Wolf, for example, proposed massive cuts to online schools in his March budget address.

Remembering a few key points is critical when analyzing cyber school performance. First, there is no typical cyber charter student. Many children enroll in cyber schools after enduring bullying or unsafe conditions in a traditional school. Online education is often the only feasible alternative for students in a persistently failing district. What's more, cyber students typically enroll with substantial learning gaps that cannot be rectified in a single school year.

Just as traditional public schools vary, the online education network is diverse in course offerings and academic achievement. It would be a mistake to paint the entire sector with a broad brush.

A charter reform bill, HB 530, currently awaits action in the state Senate. Notably, many cyber charter leaders are supportive of the legislation. Increased accountability for public schools—all public schools, not merely cyber—is a reasonable policy goal with bipartisan support.

But it would be a mistake to ignore the crucial void filled by Pennsylvania’s cyber schools. Singling out cyber schools with Wolf's punitive cuts—and treating these students as second-class citizens—does not serve the best interests of Pennsylvania families desperate for choice and opportunity.

posted by JAMES PAUL | 09:33 AM | Comments

Sobering Results on The Nation’s Report Card

NOVEMBER 2, 2015

Over the last quarter century, national education scores in both reading and math have modestly trended upward—until this year.

The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) recently released its biannual report on 4th- and 8th-grade reading and math scores. The results are sobering.  

The report, known as the “Nation’s Report Card,” draws comparisons among states and reveals overall trends in education across the country. Specifically, it measures student proficiency at the national and state levels as well as at 21 district levels (Philadelphia included).

The national level showed virtually no “proficiency” increase in any grade level or subject category. The only increase in reading scores was among 4th-grade students with disabilities or those eligible for the National School Lunch Program. Meanwhile, 8th-grade scores decreased across the board among males, females, whites, blacks, and Hispanics, as well as in suburbs, towns, and rural areas.

In Pennsylvania, 4th- and 8th-grade reading and 4th-grade math scores remained stagnant, while 8th-grade math scores dropped to a low not seen since before 2007. The commonwealth performs favorably, compared with other states, in overall NAEP performance—but much of this is driven by demographics. After adjusting by race and income, Pennsylvania ranks 16th in NAEP performance, illustrating a sizable achievement gap.

Philadelphia specifically, where scores are typically well below the national average, saw drops in 4th-grade math and no significant growth anywhere else. Student achievement in Philadelphia is far below the major urban cities average, exceeding only Detroit, Cleveland, Baltimore, and Fresno. In fact, students in Philadelphia did not achieve proficiency rates above 20 percent in either subject matter or grade level. In other words, fewer than 1 in 5 Philadelphia students are on grade level in math or reading.

Students and families cannot afford to wait another two years to learn whether scores improve or continue declining. A solution to this disturbing reality is the expansion of educational options through the EITC and OSTC programs, which empower students to attend high-performing private schools and deliver cost-savings to taxpayers. Unfortunately, the EITC and OSTC programs are currently in limbo—held hostage by the Wolf administration as leverage for massive tax hikes.

The Nation’s Report Card results underscore the urgent need for expanded school choice in Pennsylvania. Our state's children deserve no less. 

posted by MARC PUGLIESE, JAMES PAUL | 01:51 PM | Comments

Audio: Wolf's Budget Tactics Harm Students

OCTOBER 21, 2015

Pennsylvania is home to several innovative education programs, including the Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) program, which provides a path to a great education for low income students.

CF’s James Paul spoke with WSBA’s Gary Sutton to explain how Gov. Wolf’s hostage-taking budget tactics are hurting students dependent on the EITC. By essentially putting the the program on hold, Gov. Wolf is severing a lifeline that many low income families use to escape failing schools.

[EITC] gets better results for families, lets them go to a school that best fits their needs, and also results in a great savings to the taxpayer. But instead of letting this program go forward and letting students be educated and teachers teach, it seems the Wolf administration is content to spread the pain around.

Despite claiming that his “hands are tied,” freezing the funding process for these educational programs demonstrates how Gov. Wolf prioritizes politics over school children and teachers. 

Click here or listen below to hear more.  

The Gary Sutton Show airs daily on WSBA 910AM in the York area.

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posted by JONATHAN REGINELLA | 03:56 PM | Comments