Education Spending

Pennsylvania school districts spent $27.4 billion in 2014-15, an all-time high, according to the latest data from the Pennsylvania Department of Education. This represents a $1.3 billion increase from 2013-14.

Districts spent nearly $16,000 per student in 2014-15, up from $15,019 in 2013-14. Total education spending steadily increased over the last five years, save for 2011-12 upon the expiration of temporary federal stimulus dollars.

<<Get the full Education Spending Trends Policy Memo>>




Recent Issues

Is Your School Hoarding Cash? 42% of Districts Hold Questionable Reserves

JUNE 16, 2016 | News Release by COMMONWEALTH FOUNDATION

School district reserves total $4.3 billion statewide. When cries for more school funding—and property tax increases—are constant, how much is too much to hold in reserve?

'Underfunded' Pa. Schools Spend Nearly $16,000 Per Pupil

JUNE 14, 2016 | News Release by COMMONWEALTH FOUNDATION

Contradicting the claim that Pennsylvania underfunds its school system, public school spending hit an all-time high in the 2014-15 school year, approaching $27.4 billion—or $15,854 per student—according to the latest state Department of Education data.

School Spending Update, 2014-15

JUNE 8, 2016 | Policy Memo by JAMES PAUL

Pennsylvania school districts spent approximately $27.4 billion in 2014-15. This represents a $1.3 billion increase from 2013-14, despite a 12,000 student decrease in average daily membership.





Recent Blog Posts

School Districts Amass Record Reserve Funds

JUNE 15, 2016

Is your local school board planning to raise property taxes despite holding millions in reserve funds? For many Pennsylvania school districts, the answer may be “yes.”  

Check out CF's sortable, searchable database of fund balances for Pennsylvania’s 500 school districts in the 2014-15 school year. It is important to note these figures predate the 9 month budget impasse, during which Gov. Wolf held school districts hostage in an attempt to extract record-high tax hikes from families and businesses.

Many districts were forced to dip into their reserves last year, as a result of Gov. Wolf's actions. (Next summer's financial reports will reveal how much districts were forced to "spend down"). But the sheer size of reserve funding in certain school districts is staggering—especially given the constant drumbeat that Pennslyvania schools are "underfunded." 

A district’s fund balance—what it owns minus it what it owes—is comprised of assigned, committed, and unassigned funds. Assigned and committed reserves are available funds designated for a specific purpose, while unassigned funds are available for any purpose.

State law requires that districts seeking tax hikes limit their unassigned fund balances to 8 to 12 percent of total spending. Our sortable database includes the total fund balance for each district, as well as each district’s total expenditures in 2014-15. It also includes each district’s fund balance as a percentage of total expenditures.

Auditor General Eugene DePasquale, speaking to Jan Murphy of Pennlive, says it is excessive to maintain a fund balance greater than 20 percent of total expenditures:

More than 300 of the 747 districts, charter schools and career and technical centers included in the department's data had fund balances topping 20 percent of their total expenditures, which is where state Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said he believes the line should be drawn.

"It is a judgment call as to what is too high," DePasquale said. "Certainly anything that is above 20 percent, clearly that's where you start to question it."

In fact, there are 21 districts who have socked away over 50 percent (!) of their total expenditures in reserve. When looking only at unassigned fund balances, 36 districts have over 20 percent of total expenditures squirreled away.

These figures should be eye-opening to anyone who believes Pennsylvania schools are unfunded—and they should be a wakeup call for school board officials who instinctively seek higher taxes from state or local taxpayers.

Check out CF's sortable, searchable database.

 

 

 

Largest Fund Balances
As % of Expenditures

District

County

%

Southern Fulton

Fulton

84.93%

Northwestern

Erie

78.07%

Union

Clarion

76.26%

Brockway Area

Jefferson

75.64%

Salisbury-Elk Lick

Somerset

73.26%

West Jefferson Hills

Allegheny

71.67%

Commodore Perry

Mercer

70.94%

Forbes Road

Fulton

65.60%

Iroquois

Erie

63.70%

Central Cambria

Cambria

60.61%

 

Largest Fund Balances

District

County

$

Pittsburgh

Allegheny

 $   198,989,522

Lower Merion

Montgomery

 $      55,974,232

Altoona Area

Blair

 $      53,772,084

East Stroudsburg Area

Monroe

 $      47,573,171

Pocono Mountain

Monroe

 $      45,944,586

Neshaminy

Bucks

 $      41,351,622

Abington

Montgomery

 $      39,627,474

Reading

Berks

 $      36,985,138

Allentown City

Lehigh

 $      36,444,773

North Penn

Montgomery 

 $      36,343,484

 
 

posted by JAMES PAUL | 04:30 PM | Comments

Is $27 Billion Enough?

JUNE 8, 2016

Is $27 billion enough money for Pennsylvania's public schools? This is the question policymakers must answer before voting to raise taxes on families, businesses, and entrepreneurs.

According to the most recent figures from the Department of Education, Pennsylvania school districts spent approximately $27.4 billion in 2014-15--an increase of nearly $1.3 billion over the prior year. This amounts to nearly $16,000 per student, which ranks top 10 nationally

Notably, school districts added $200 million to their reserve funds in 2014-15, with a combined $4.28 billion in committed, assigned, and unassigned fund balances. 

CF's most recent Policy Memo includes trends on education spending, revenue, pension costs, fund balances, and property taxes. Read the complete memo here

posted by JAMES PAUL | 01:57 PM | Comments

An Easy Way to Give School Budgets a Boost

MAY 19, 2016

“I want to put more education dollars in our classrooms, not our school buses,” said Auditor General Eugene DePasquale, while releasing an analysis of 19 school districts that exceeded their state busing allowance.

According to the report, 95% of overspending districts do not make use of competitive bidding. DePasquale says it’s time to make contract bidding for transportation services mandatory:

Some school districts simply don’t believe what the audits showed. In fact, six of the 19 districts indicate either in response to their audit or in their action, that would be Scranton, that they have no intention of seeking bids for transportation services. Even though the audits showed, and they agreed, that they were paying too much. . . they offer some type of justification as to why they don’t seek competitive bids. It will range from well there isn’t any competition out there, it’s not a requirement. And the list goes on and on and on. And I just view them as lame excuse, after lame excuse, after lame excuse.

DePasquale indicates school districts could save nearly $55 million without raising taxes or cutting programs. Making use of competitive bidding to save public funds should be standard operating procedure. This is a critical step school boards must take to ensure education dollars are spent in the classroom, where they belong. 

posted by ELIZABETH STELLE | 11:33 AM | Comments